20 January 2019

Jetting into AucklandJ

Jettting into Auckland later this afternoon was Alliance Airlines' Fokker 70 VH-QQX which is operatng a Tauck Tour of New Zealand. Does anyone know if this is the last of the Alliance contract or part of the Air Chathams' contract?
Photos taken on 20 January 2019
 


19 January 2019

Getting Closer to Delivery

Many thanks to Cody for allowing me to use these flights of ATR 72-500 ZK-MCO which is soon to join the Air Chathams fleet. Yesterday it did a divestment flight in preparation for handover.

ATR 72-500 ZK-MCO in Air Chathams colours at Nelson on 18 January 2019 
 


18 January 2019

The Toroa Freighter

I was delighted to catch Air Chathams' Convair 580 frieghter ZK-KFL at Auckland today. 

The Convair features a toroa also known as the Chatham Island mollymawk or Chatham Island albatross. They are a rare albatross with a restricted range. It is striking in appearance, with a dark grey head and bright yellow bill. Endemic to the Chatham Islands, the entire population breeds on The Pyramid, an isolated, almost inaccessible rock stack located south of Pitt Island in the South Pacific Ocean. They spend most of their life at sea only returning to land to breed.

For more on the toroa see http://nzbirdsonline.org.nz/species/chatham-island-mollymawk

The toroa was being painted by Mr G... that is, Graham 'Mr G' Hoete, a street artist from the Bay of Plenty who specialises in photorealism

Arriving back into Auckland from Blenheim's Woodbourne Airport on 18 January 2018 was Air Chathams' Convair 580 ZK-KFL (callsign CHATHAMS 580). I presume it was carrying crayfish.



For more on Air Chathams and its Convairs see :
http://3rdlevelnz.blogspot.com/2016/01/air-chathams-30-years-on.html

17 January 2019

Northland on the 14th

A quick visit to Kerikeri on the 14th of January found Fisher R80 Tiger Moth ZK-DSW in the circuit
 

An hour down the road Cessna 150 ZK-BAD was at Whangarei 
along with Cessna 172 ZK-BZS.
I made a mistake in November, Sunair does have one Cessna 172 registered to them in the form of ZK-DPN
I was also delighted to get a much better shot of Piper Chieftain VH-OMN at Whangarei

16 January 2019

Looking to spread its wings


This post appeared on Air Napier's Facebook page late this afternoon. It woudl appear Gisborne is on the radar for scheduled flights... At present Gisborne has scheduled flights to Wellington or Auckland. Air Napier operates a weekday courier service between Napier and Gisborne (Tuesday to Saturday mornings) and return service from Gisborne to Napier (Monday to Friday).


Again, watch this space for the unfolding story

Back in the air again...

Welcome back to Air Gisborne's Piper Pa31 Panther which flew over home into Hamilton this morning from Gisborne. It has been out of the air for a spell for major check. The aircraft is a regular into Hamilton bringing doctors and patients to Waikato Hospital

15 January 2019

Fly My Sky toughing it out




A small airline that got off to a slow start will continue to run daily services to and from Whangārei after picking up business lately. Fly My Sky first flew from Auckland to Whangārei on the morning of October 29 with only its chief executive Keith McKenzie and Whangārei MP Dr Shane Reti on board. The return flight on its 10-seater Britten Norman Islander twin-engine plane had just one passenger. Since then, flights have been near capacity on the route on which Fly My Sky competes with national carrier Air New Zealand, which has welcomed the new airline's entry into the Northland market. Fly My Sky chief executive Keith McKenzie earlier blamed at a lack of booking on a lack of advertising but expected business to pick up heading into the busy festive season. Yesterday, he was more optimistic about the airline's future on the Auckland to Whangārei route. "Passenger numbers are definitely building more towards what we're after. They are still slightly slow but we're getting quite a few return and repeat customers," McKenzie said. "Obviously the timing of our flights suit our customers. We're still getting quite a few inquiries going forward and it's looking encouraging with several flights almost full." The airline flies into Whangārei twice daily from Monday to Friday, with a one-way fare of $99 including 23kg luggage. Flights leave Auckland at 6.55am and 1.20pm, returning at 8.25am and 2.45pm. McKenzie said doctors who flew with Fly My Sky from Auckland to Whangārei for work have shown an interest in flying with the company again. He said there were no plans to increase flights on the route at this stage. "The current flights need to be functioning well before we look at increasing them because it costs tens of thousands of dollars to run scheduled services each month," he said. The Auckland-based airline runs Britten Normal Islander planes from Auckland to Great Barrier Island and Whangārei.Another airline, Sunair, operates between Whangārei, Great Barrier Island, Hamilton and Tauranga, based on demand and plan to open a flight training school in Whangārei this year.

Source : 

First a tail view... now the whole aircraft...

Thanks to Peter who caught the new Air Chathams' ATR 72-500 ZK-MCO at Nelson today...


Delayed - Again!



Following on from the posts of 10 and 21 December 2018, Originair flights are still not operating and won't be starting now until at least the 22nd of February according to their reservations system.

And one again Originair's Facebook page is inviting people to book now...




14 January 2019

A picture speaks a 1000 words...

Two shots of ATR 72-500 ZK-MCO...

...at Auckland on 10 August 2015
...and at Nelson today, 14 January 2019

This is no longer the best kept secret in New Zealand... Thanks Warwick, Peter and Hugh for your pics of MCO.

Apparently MCO is going to be flying Tauck Tours around New Zealand. Meanwhile flying into Wellington today was Alliance Airlines' Fokker F70 VH-NKU for Tauck Tours work over, presumably for the last time.

Note the lack of HF aerials on MCO - so it is not going to be flying to any islands other that the North or South in the immediate future. Interestingly compare the photos of the three Saabs - https://3rdlevelnz.blogspot.com/2019/01/ciy-in-service.html - I wonder what that means!

Stay tune for this unfolding story...





The Tranzair Franchise




Tranzair was not an airline, rather it is the name under which a number of small regionals operated in association with Ansett New Zealand on a franchise basis. These airlines' flights operated with the Ansett ZQ flight designator, used Ansett New Zealand's terminal facilities as well as Ansett’s reservations system, marketing strategy, ticketing, accounting as well as ground handling facilities and staff. Some management and administration support was also provided. Astral Air Services and Rex Aviation operated all their passenger services under the Tranzair banner.

Bell Air and Northern Commuter Airlines both had their own life before operating under the Tranzair banner. 

In addition to these airlines Air Wanganui, Aspiring Air, Pacifica Air and Waterwings Airways  all flew under the Ansett New Zealand umbrella but retained their names. though in later years Bell Air operated under the Tranzair banner.

Pasted below is a summary of each of the Tranzair operations and a link to where the full details can be found...



Operated Wanganui-Wellington


Following Eagle Air's take over of Air New Zealand's Friendship service from Wanganui to Auckland, Air Wanganui operated the Wanganui-Wellington route 3 days a week under the Tranzair from the 9th of April 1990. The service was short-lived.

Post completed - to be published in 2019




Operated Wanaka-Queenstown


Aspiring Air was not formally part of Tranzair but operated flights connecting Wanaka to Ansett New Zealand's services at Queenstown from 1987 to early 1988.

Post completed - to be published in 2019





ASTRAL AIR SERVICES
Operated Napier-Auckland and Napier-Wellington


Astral Air Services operated scheduled services between Napier and Auckland and Napier and Wellington. Services began on the 5th of May 1991 but the airline closed 53 days later.

Post completed - to be published in 2019


Operated Whakatane-Auckland and Whakatane-Palmerston North

On the 5th of March 1990 Bell Air began a new relationship with Ansett New Zealand whereby Ansett provided terminal services in Auckland, baggage handling, ZQ (Ansett) flight numbers, "through fares" to Ansett's destinations beyond Auckland, access to their reservations system and marketing support but continuing to operate under the Bell Air name. 

By January 1992, however, Bell Air's Beech 99 was repainted into Tranzair titles but with smaller “Operated by Bell Air” titles on the side of the aircraft. The Beech 99 flew its last Whakatane-Auckland-Whakatane service on the 6th of November 1995. This was the last Tranzair flight and scheduled service operated by Bell Air.

The full Bell Air story can be found here



Operated Whangarei-Auckland and Whakatane-Auckland


From the 16th of April 1990 Northern Commurer Airlines' Nomad was replaced by Piper Chieftain ZK-NCA which was painted in Ansett's Tranzair colour scheme.

On the 7th of November 1995 Whakatane's Tranzair service, which had been operated by Bell Air, was replaced was taken over by Rex Aviation using Bandeirante aircraft and Northern Commuter Airlines’ Chieftain. This relationship continued until Tranzair was rebranded as Ansett New Zealand Regional.

The full Northern Commuter Airlines' story and a fuller account of its Tranzair operation can be found here :



Operated Christchurch-Alexandra-Wanaka-Christchurch

On the 6th of January 1988 Pacifica started a new route from Christchurch to Alexandra and Wanaka using a Piper Chieftain. Marketed as the Edgewater Express the service was designed to fly guests to Wanaka’s Edgewater Resort hotel as well as other holidaymakers and visitors and the airline connected with Ansett New Zealand flights at Christchurch. Pacifica Air's services ended in February 1989.


The Pacifica Air story and its relationship with Ansett New Zealand 
can be found here :



Operated Nelson-Wellington, Blenheim-Wellington and Palmerston North-Wellington, Whakatane-Auckland and Whangarei-Auckland


Rex Aviation began services between Nelson and Wellington under the Tranzair banner on the 7th of July 1989. The following year a new route between Wellington and Blenheim was operated from the 7th of October 1990 with Palmerston North added to Rex Aviation’s Tranzair network on the 4th of November 1990. The initial services to Palmerston North were operated by a Piper Chieftain but apart from these early services Rex Aviation Embraer Bandeirantes. 

On the 7th of November 1995 Rex Aviation deployed a Bandeirante to Auckland and this aircraft, along with Northern Commuter Airlines’ Piper Chieftain, was used to operate Tranzair’s service from Auckland to both Whakatane and Whangarei. 

On the 29th of February 1996 the Tranzair branding was changed to Ansett New Zealand Regional. 

The full Rex Aviation story 
and a fuller account of its Tranzair operation can be found here :




Operated Te Anau-Queenstown and Queenstown-Milford Sound


Waterwings Airways was not formally part of Tranzair but operated flights connecting Te Anau and Milford Sound to Ansett New Zealand's services to and from Queenstown from 1987 to 1998. Cessna and GAF Nomad aircraft were used.

Post completed - to be published in 2019

The Ansett New Zealand Regional Franchise





Ansett New Zealand Regional was the new name for the two remaining airlines that had previously operated under the Tranzair name in association with Ansett New Zealand on a franchise basis. On the 29th of February 1996 Tranzair became Ansett New Zealand Regional and Rex Aviation's Bandeirantes and Northern Commuter Airlines' aircraft were rebranded accordingly. 

Pasted below is a summary of each of the three Ansett New Zealand regional operations  and a link to where the full details can be found...



Operated Rotorua-Auckland


In October 1998 Air National introduced a British Aerospace J32EP Jetstream, ZK-ECN (c/n 967) to its fleet. The aircraft was named “City of Rotorua” and began operating Auckland-Rotorua flights on behalf of Ansett New Zealand Regional. It was never painted in Ansett New Zealand Regional colours. It continued to do this until Ansett NZ was taken over by Qantas.

Details of Air National's Jetstream operation 
and a fuller account of its Ansett NZ Regional operation can be found here :




Operated Whangarei-Auckland and Whakatane-Auckland


The Northern Commuter Airlines operation of Ansett New Zealand Regional services was shortlived. On the the 3rd of November 1996 the Whakatane-Auckland service was withdrawn and this marked the end of Northern Commuter Airlines involvement in the franchise with the Whangarei service being taken over entirely by Rex Aviation Bandeirantes. 

The full Northern Commuter Airlines' story 
and a fuller account of its Ansett NZ Regional operation can be found here :




Operated Nelson-Wellington, Blenheim-Wellington and Palmerston North-Wellington, Whakatane-Auckland and Whangarei-Auckland


There was no immediate change after the Rex Aviation fleet was branded as Ansett New Zealand Regional but on the the 3rd of November 1996 the Whakatane-Auckland service was withdrawn. This is was followed by the withdrawal of the the Whangarei-Auckland service on the 1st of August 1998.

1999 saw the replacement of the Bandeirante fleet with three British Aerospace Jetstream 32s. 

On the 23rd of March 2000, News Corp. Ltd. sold Ansett New Zealand and Rex Aviation to New Zealand consortium Tasman Pacific Group. The Ansett New Zealand Regional fleet of Jetstreams that were operated by Rex Aviation were subsequently repainted in Tasman Pacific Connection’s colour scheme from the 4th of September 2000.


The full Rex Aviation story 
and a fuller account of its Ansett NZ Regional operation can be found here :




13 January 2019

Aussies in Northland et al

In NZ's northern most airport at Kaitaia today. 13 January 2019, was Piper Archer VH-BVN... 

...while down the road at Kerikeri was Piper Chieftain VH-OMN

Also at Kaitaia was Cessna 182 Skylane ZK-AFT - I hate covers!

...and the Kaitaia Aero Club's new Cessna 162 Skycather ZK-KTC

And down at Kerikeri the excitement extended to Air New Zealand Bombarider Q300 ZK-NEQ...

...and Tecnam P2008 ZK-RJN which was tramping around the circuit

Rex Aviation's Tranzair and Freight Operations





In late May 1989 Ansett New Zealand announced that it was “teaming up” with Rex Aviation (NZ) Limited to offer flights between Nelson and Wellington using an 18-seater Embraer Bandeirante. Rex Aviation’s New Zealand history goes back to 1948 but in 1989 it was owned by Pacific Aviation of Australia with links to Ansett Airlines. At the time the Ansett New Zealand operation was announced Rex Aviation had a contract to maintain two New Zealand-based business jets.

The initial plans for the Wellington-Nelson service envisaged Rex Aviation operating five return Bandeirante flights between Nelson and Wellington on weekdays, with two flights on Saturdays and four on Sundays. At this time Air New Zealand were still operating Friendships to Nelson and  in speaking about the choice of the Bandeirante Ansett’s acting chief executive Mr Graeme Campbell was reported as saying, "Frequency is the name of the game. It is better to have five flights on an 18-seat plane a day than one 40-seat Friendship flying in.” The planned air service envisaged Nelson passengers connecting with Ansett New Zealand flights at Wellington. 

The new franchise was branded as Tranzair. Embraer EMB-110P2 Bandeirante ZK-REX, imported from Australia for the service, carried Tranzair titles. On the tail of the aircraft the red and white stars of the New Zealand flag were displayed without the tails that featured on the Ansett New Zealand aircraft. Later “The Whisper Connection” titling featured above the passenger windows. Only two Bandeirantes and two Chieftains wore the New Zealand stars.

An early morning photo of Rex Aviation's first Embraer Bandeirante ZK-REX painted in the original Tranzair colours at Nelson on 24 October 1989.
The Tranzair timetable effective 14 December 1989

A unique feature about ZK-REX was that it was New Zealand’s only P2 variant Bandeirante.  The P2 differed from the other Bandeirantes operated in New Zealand by having a second passenger door at the rear of the cabin instead of the large cargo door of the P1 variant.

A look at the P2 variant doors... Embraer Bandeirante ZK-REX at Nelson on 4 January 1991

Services started on the 7th of July 1989. While the first flight used ZK-REX a delay in obtaining a certificate of airworthiness for the new Bandeirante aircraft delayed its formal introduction and a Piper PA31-350 was used to maintain the new air service for the first two days. The Bandeirante officially entered service on the 9th of July 1989. Initial response was good and after ten days the Nelson Evening Mail reported “that most flights had been more than half full with Friday, Saturday and Sunday being ‘excellent’”. 

A second Bandeirante, this being a P1 variant, ZK-REU, arrived in October 1990 and this enabled the introduction of a new route between Wellington and Blenheim from the 7th of October 1990. Initially five flights a day were flown out of Blenheim’s Woodbourne Airport to connect with Ansett New Zealand’s services at Wellington. 

In addition to the passenger service Rex Aviation also inaugurated a freight service from Wellington to Blenheim, Nelson and Christchurch on behalf of Ansett Air Freight. The establishment of the freight operation coincided with the closure of Safe Air’s freight operation and this led to NZ Post becoming a major csutomer. Two Cessna 208 Caravans were added to the fleet, ZK-REY in September 1990 and ZK-REZ in November 1990. Fokker Friendship ZK-RTA arrived in November 1990 and this operated scheduled cargo services for NZ Post between Wellington and Christchurch six days a week. The Friendship was also used, as needed to Blenheim and Nelson. All these aircraft wore Rex Aviation titles.

Rex Aviation Cessna Caravan at Nelson on a freight flight on 14 November 1990
Rex Aviation Fokker Friendship at Christchurch on a freight flight on 15 May 1991

Palmerston North was added to Rex Aviation’s Tranzair network on the 4th of November 1990 with flights offered to and from Wellington. These flights were initially operated by Piper PA31-350 Chieftains. At various times the Rex Aviation Tranzair operation used two Chieftains, ZK-CGS, which was painted in Tranzair colours, and ZK-FQW. 

The two leased Piper Chieftains, above ZK-CGS at Christchurch on 12 August 1991 and below ZK-FQW at Christchurch on 17 November 1990. 





In March 1991 Bandeirante ZK-REU was replaced with ZK-TRL. The arrival of ZK-TRL, which began service on the 27th of March 1991, heralded the introduction of the Ansett New Zealand tail design with the stars having the coloured tails. Also changed was the Tranzair script with Tranzair gaining a capital T. The addition of ZK-TRL to the fleet also began the practice of using registrations based on the TRanzair franchise instead of operator, REx Aviation. In May 1991 two more Bandeirantes entered service, ZK-TRM, on the 5th of May and ZK-TRK on the 19th. The P2 variant ZK-REX which finished service in June 1991. The addition of a third Bandeirante enabled the replacement of the Piper Chieftains on the Wellington-Palmerston North route. The last Chieftain service was flown to Palmerston North by ZK-CGS on the 5th of June 1991, and ZK-TRL flew the first Bandeirante service the following day.

Busy Cook Strait flying... The Tranzair timetables for Blenheim and Nelson effective 2 December 1991





Embraer Bandeirante ZK-TRM displaying the new Ansett stars and the new ZK-TRx series registrations.
Photo taken at Wellington on 14 January 1992

1993 saw further changes in the Bandeirante fleet and once again the aircraft reverting to the ZK-REx registration series. Confusing the issue Rex Aviation reused registrations and aircraft came back into the fleet. ZK-REW, a P1 variant Bandeirante started service on 27 June 1993 while the P2 variant Bandeirante ZK-REX, previously operated by Rex Aviation, arrived back in the fleet in June 1993. ZK-TRL was withdrawn from service on the 19th of June 1993 and ZK-TRK a week later on the 26th of June 1993. ZK-TRM was withdrawn on the 2nd of January 1994 with ZK-REV taking up service on the 28th of November 1993 as its replacement.



By early 1992 the Fokker Friendship freighter had its Rex Aviation titles replaced with Ansett Air Freight titles. The Cessna Caravans were sold in late 1993. By early 1995 the Ansett Air Freight scheduled freight services were no longer being operated, although the Friendship was getting ad-hoc work quite frequently. The Friendship was finally returned to Australia in March 1996.

Rebranded in Ansett Air Freight titles, Rex Aviation's Fokker Friendship ZK-RTA at Nelson for an air show on 27 March 1992.
Also at an air show, Cessna Caravan ZK-REZ at Wanaka on 18 April 1992

On the 7th of November 1995 Bell Air withdrew from operating Whakatane's Tranzair service. Rex Aviation deployed a Bandeirante to Auckland and this aircraft, along with Northern Commuter Airlines’ Piper Chieftain, was used to operate Tranzair’s service from Auckland to both Whakatane and Whangarei. On weekdays two Bandeirante flights were operated between Auckland and both centres with the Chieftain flights operating other flights, again to both centres. A lesser schedule operated in the weekend.

From the Ansett New Zealand timetable of September 1996 showing the mixture of flights operated by Rex Aviation's Bandeirante and Northern Commuter Airlines' Chieftain 



Sometime around this time the script of the Tranzair titles were changed and the stars on the tail were changed to the Australian stars of Ansett Australia.

The last Embraer Bandeirante in the Rex Aviation fleet, ZK-REV at Nelson on 5 February 1996




The change to the tails of the aircraft was followed on the 29th of February 1996 by the Tranzair name being changed to Ansett New Zealand Regional and the Bandeirantes were rebranded accordingly. February 1996 also saw ZK-REZ (previously ZK-TRL) added to the fleet taking the total fleet to five Bandeirantes.

Showing off its Ansett New Zealand Regional titles, Embraer Bandeirante ZK-REW at Blenheim's Woodbourne Airport on a stormy day on 19 November 1996

The Ansett New Zealand Regional routes operated by Rex Aviation with services from Auckland to Whakatane and Whangarei and from Wellington to Blenheim, Nelson and Palmerston North.


On the 3rd of November 1996 the Whakatane-Auckland service was withdrawn with Ansett New Zealand citing economic factors for pulling out of Whakatane. The withdrawal from Whakatane allowed Ansett Regional to offer Whangarei an all Bandeirante service which was operated by Rex Aviation.

On the 1st of August 1998 Ansett New Zealand ended its Whangarei service after deeming it highly unprofitable. The Mayor of Whangarei, Stan Semenoff, said he was saddened by the news because Ansett had provided good service and competition. Ansett at this stage were operating five flights a day from Whangarei using the Rex Aviation Bandeirante. This compared with 10 services offered by Air New Zealand. The final Whangarei flights were flown in Embraer Bandeirante ZK-REX under the command of Captains Scott Hutchison and Colin Wood.

One of the major issues with the Bandeirante was that they were unpressurised which had less passenger appeal. This issue was resolved in February 1999 when ZK-REW, the first of three pressurised British Aerospace Jetstream 32s arrived to replace the Bandeirantes, entered service. The Jetstreams, ZK-REY, ZK-RES and ZK-REW, were painted in Ansett New Zealand Regional colours and were operated by Rex Aviation on the Cook Strait and Palmerston North services. Jetstream ZK-REY entered service the following month in March 1999.

The timetable for the Ansett New Zealand Regional Jetstreams in the February 2000 Ansett New Zealand timetable. It is interesting that this timetable is still indicating flights between Wellington and Palmerston North being operated by Bandeirantes.


The arrival of the Jetstreams marked the end of the Bandeirantes and the last of Rex Aviation operated scheduled Bandeirante service was flown on 4th June of 1999 under the command of Craig Nichols and John Brooker in ZK-REV. John Lanham, CEO of Rex Aviation, told Pacific Wings, “the Bandeirantes have been great workhorses in terms of capability and economy.  The Bandeirante aircraft were safe, efficient and economical and have an excellent safety record in New Zealand operations. In many respects no obvious replacement was available, however, with no pressurisation, revised increased passenger weights and increased congestion in the Wellington region, this limited the Bandeirante operations.” The 4th of June 1990 also saw the introduction to service of the third Jetstream, ZK-RES.

BAe Jetstream 31 ZK-RES arrives at Nelson on 25 June 1990
The seating layout for the Dash 8s operated by Ansett New Zealand and the Bandeirantes and Jetstreams operated by Rex Aviation

On the 23rd of March 2000, News Corp. Ltd. sold Ansett New Zealand and Rex Aviation to New Zealand consortium Tasman Pacific Group. The Ansett New Zealand Regional fleet of Jetstreams that were operated by Rex Aviation were subsequently repainted in Tasman Pacific Connection’s colour scheme from the 4th of September 2000.

The three Tranzair tails...



Aircraft Operated

British Aerospace Jetstream 3201 EP
ZK-RES (c/n 969)
ZK-REW/2 (c/n 968)
ZK-REY/2 (c/n 946)


An Ansett New Zealand Regional BAe Jetstream 32 ZK-REW at Nelson on 25 June 1999

Cessna 208 Caravan 
ZK-REY (c/n 20800151)
ZK-REZ (c/n 20800157)

Embraer EMB-110P1 Bandeirante
ZK-REU (c/n 110248)
ZK-REU/2 (c/n 110298)
ZK-REV (c/n 110274)
ZK-REW (c/n 110238)
ZK-REX/3 (c/n 110407)
ZK-REZ/2 (c/n 110417) previously ZK-TRL
ZK-TRK (c/n 110422)
ZK-TRL (c/n 110417) later became ZK-REZ
ZK-TRM (c/n 110436)


The same registration but different aircraft and different variants, Above ZK-REX/2, the only P2 variant Bandeirante used in New Zealand.  The P2 differed from the other Bandeirantes operated in New Zealand by having a second passenger door at the rear of the cabin instead. Embraer Bandeirante ZK-REX at Nelson on 4 January 1991. Below, ZK-REX/3, a P1 variant with a large cargo door as seen at Nelson on 6 December 1996.


Embraer EMB-110P2 Bandeirante
ZK-REX/2 (c/n 110184)

Fokker F.27-6108QC Friendship
ZK-RTA (c/n 10315)

Rex Aviation Fokker Friendship ZK-RTA at Christchurch on 9 December 1990
Piper PA31-350 Navajo Chieftain
ZK-CGS/3 (c/n 31-7852068)
ZK-FQW (c/n 31-7952206)

As with most of my profiles I often use the information other people have put together and from that I try to stitch together a full picture. With this post I would particularly like to acknowledge the work of Phillip Treweek for his work on the histories of the Bandeirantes that served in New Zealand, see... http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/bande.html